Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

This is a slight rewrite of a post I wrote last year. I think it is pretty good and I will like to recognize all the McCormack mothers even with a reused post.

Happy Mother’s Day, Ladies!

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Today is Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow without any children. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 total children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

Young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel (Davis) McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth Jane (Rohr) McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special and to I owe much. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

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Happy Birthday, Aunt Kate!

Once again, I am doing something I don’t like to do. I am going repost my previously  published post about my great grand-aunt Kate, but since I haven’t been able learn anything new and I do want to honor the memory of my great grand-aunt Kate. I do wish that I could have met her while she was alive and well. I wonder what kind of lady she was. Thanks!

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Today is my great grand-aunt Katherine “Kate” Fidelia (McCormack) Ingleright’s birthday. Katherine was the youngest of 10 children of Michael and Catherine McCormack. She was born on 26 Nov 1870 in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright [1]

On 19 Jul 1899 in Lapeer, Michigan she married Leon Ray Ingleright of Niles, Michigan. For most of the next ten years, she and Leon lived with her parents in Otter Lake. [2] Sometime before the 1910 census, her husband who was a doctor, got his own practice or joined one in Rose City, Michigan. [3][4] As far as I know, she and Leon had two wonderful children, Violet Cassie and Leon Ray, Jr. They were born in 1901 and 1903 respectively and both in Rose City. At sometime between the 1920 and the 1930 censuses, Katherine and her family moved to Niles, Michigan. [5] They and their descendants would make Niles and the southwestern corner of Michigan their home up to the present.

There is one reason that my Aunt Katherine is special to me. She and I share the same birthday. I was born 91 years after her. In fact, she was still alive when I was born. But my parents had no knowledge of her branch of the McCormack family.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!

Footnotes;

1. picture of Katherine Fidelia (McCormack) Ingleright, , 2009, privately held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2009
2. 1900 United States Federal Census, Otter Lake, Marathon Township, Lapeer County, Michigan, population schedule, ED 43, Pg. 7B, dwelling 173, family 173, Michael McCormack, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com, accessed 6 Feb 2011, citing Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
3. 1910 United States Federal Census, Rose City, Ogemaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 38, Pg. 250, dwelling 3, family 75, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, accessed 1 Dec 2012, citing Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
4. 1920 United States Federal Census, Rose City, Ogemaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 280, dwelling 54, family 55, Leon R. Ingelright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
5. 1930 United States Federal Census, Niles, Berrien County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 12, Pg. 235, dwelling 71, family 84, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

Yesterday was Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 more children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

A young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel Davis McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel Davis McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

Happy Birthday, Aunt Kate!

I don’t like to repost previously published posts, but since I haven’t been able learn anything new and I do want to honor the memory of my great grand-aunt Kate. I do wish that I could have met her while she was alive and well. I wonder what kind of lady she was. Thanks!

*******************************************

Today is my great grand-aunt Katherine “Kate” Fidelia (McCormack) Ingleright’s birthday. Katherine was the youngest of 10 children of Michael and Catherine McCormack. She was born on 26 Nov 1870 in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright [1]

On 19 Jul 1899 in Lapeer, Michigan she married Leon Ray Ingleright of Niles, Michigan. For most of the next ten years, she and Leon lived with her parents in Otter Lake. [2] Sometime before the 1910 census, her husband who was a doctor, got his own practice or joined one in Rose City, Michigan. [3][4] As far as I know, she and Leon had two wonderful children, Violet Cassie and Leon Ray, Jr. They were born in 1901 and 1903 respectively and both in Rose City. At sometime between the 1920 and the 1930 censuses, Katherine and her family moved to Niles, Michigan. [5] They and their descendants would make Niles and the southwestern corner of Michigan their home up to the present.

There is one reason that my Aunt Katherine is special to me. She and I share the same birthday. I was born 91 years after her. In fact, she was still alive when I was born. But my parents had no knowledge of her branch of the McCormack family.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!

Footnotes;

1. picture of Katherine Fidelia (McCormack) Ingleright, , 2009, privately held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2009
2. 1900 United States Federal Census, Otter Lake, Marathon Township, Lapeer County, Michigan, population schedule, ED 43, Pg. 7B, dwelling 173, family 173, Michael McCormack, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com, accessed 6 Feb 2011, citing Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
3. 1910 United States Federal Census, Rose City, Ogemaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 38, Pg. 250, dwelling 3, family 75, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, accessed 1 Dec 2012, citing Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
4. 1920 United States Federal Census, Rose City, Ogemaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 280, dwelling 54, family 55, Leon R. Ingelright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
5. 1930 United States Federal Census, Niles, Berrien County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 12, Pg. 235, dwelling 71, family 84, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

New Otter Lake Postcards Pt. 1

Hello once again! Today, I would like to start a short series of posts about four postcards featuring scenes of Otter Lake, Michigan that I recently bought on Ebay. Over the next few weeks, I will be introducing you to my newest additions to my McCormack family postcard collection.

The first one that I would like to show you is of a view looking down Detroit Street towards Otter Lake. There are quite a few things that I find interesting about this postcard. The first, which really “bothers” me, is that there is NO date anywhere on this postcard. However, I think I can at least guesstimate a beginning date. The car on the right side (of the road) is, in my opinion, a Ford Model A. That car was first introduced in Oct 1927. The next thing that I used to ID a starting date is the square sign above the end of the (horse hitch) or the middle of the first building. It is an IGA or Independent Grocers Alliance sign. They were founded in May 1927. Those are about the only things that I can see that could be used to assign a date to this postcard.

Looking down Detroit Street with the McCormack building on the left.

Looking down Detroit Street with the McCormack building on the left. [1]

Since most of the obvious date indicators in this postcard start in 1927, I will use 1930 a rough date for this postcard. The building on the left with the Purol gas pump in the front at one time house a general store operated by my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. At the end of the buildings is another Purol gas pump and I think it maybe in front of the store (at one time) operated by William S. Hemingway, the older brother of my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack, William’s second wife.

I hope you learned something new and thanks for stopping by!

Footnote;

1. Postcard of Detroit Street in Otter Lake, Michigan, , 2015, privately held by Jeff Ford , [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2015

New Otter Lake Postcards Pt. II

I am finally getting around to continuing the series on my Otter Lake postcard collection. But this postcard really isn’t about the McCormacks. The “marquee” is for the Hemingways. They were a local family big in the Otter Lake area. 

The W. S. Hemingway store

The W. S. Hemingway store [1]

The W. S. here would be William Sohmer Hemingway, the older brother of my great-grandmother Lavina (Hemingway) McCormack. I believe that I can make one identification in the picture above. Comparing the man at the corner of the front of the building to other pictures I have of the Hemingway clan I believe that the man is W. S. Hemingway. The one thing that I don’t know about this picture is the date. If the man at the corner of the store is indeed William S. Hemingway, then he was born in 1872. Then I am guessing that this picture was taken about 1900 to 1910. Maybe. In 1907, due to a lighting strike and explosion due to dynamite being stored in the building, the building was destroyed. So, I have narrowed the time period down to sometime before 1907. For a local tie-in, William’s sister, Lavina and her family lived two or three blocks to the left of the store as you look at it.

Thanks for stopping by and even though this post really wasn’t about the McCormacks, I hope you learned something interesting!

Footnotes;

1. Postcard of the W. S. Hemingway store in Otter Lake, Michigan, 2015, privately held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2015

Happy (Belated) Wedding Anniversary!

Hello once again! Today, even though I am a day late, I want to mark the wedding anniversary of my paternal great-grandparents, William E. McCormack and Lavina Jane Hemingway! They were married on 7 Jul 1897[1] which would make yesterday their 118th wedding anniversary! Can you imagine that being married to the same person for 118 years? The information that I have says that they were married in Otter Lake, Michigan where both of them lived at the time. I wonder if they got married at one of the local churches? St. Johns perhaps?

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

William E. McCormack

William E. McCormack

Thank you for stopping by and I hope that you learned something interesting!

Footnote;

1. “Michigan, Marriages, 1868-1925,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQQQ-FVV : accessed 16 Sep 2012), Wm. E. Mccormack and Lavina Hemingway, 7 Jul 1897.