Lost and found! A “new” McCormack!

Earlier today, I was looking through the “hints” or the “Tasks” button on the FamilySearch app, “Family Tree” when I came across a task/hint for a Lizzie McCormack. I looked at the task and the Lizzie Mccormack turned out to be Elizabeth J. (Rohr) McCormack, the wife of Edward J. McCormack, who was the son of Michael and Catherine (Paine) McCormack).

What I found is a death record for a Albert McCormack. 

Albert McCormack Death Record

Albert McCormack’s record of death [1]

Given that there was a four year gap between the birth of Albert’s brothers, William Edward b.1890 and Donald James b. 1894 and that Elizabeth seemed to have a baby every two to three years, I had suspected that there might have been another child for Edward and Elizabeth.

At first, the records that were available for Albert seemed to indicate that he was born and died on the same day of Jan 5th. I took another look at the entry for Albert’s apparent age. 

Age

his age? [1]

Initially, I thought that the entry in the month box was just an ink blob. Upon further reflection and thought, I came to the conclusion that entry was in fact, the number 5. If indeed my assumption is right that Albert was five months old when he died, that would mean that he was born sometime around Aug 1891. Given that this is death record/index, I am not going to find an exact date of birth. However, since that the person’s age is broken down into years, months and days, I could extrapolate back to arrive at a calculated date of birth. That is how I came up with the presumed date of birth of Aug 1891. Since Albert did not live that long, there is going to be a dearth of records available. There might be one record for inspection if my guess about Albert’s age of 5 months is correct. That would be a birth certificate. Now, I can look at SeekingMichigan.org to see if they might have a copy of his birth certificate. I know that they have death certificates there.

There was one other thing that I wanted to discuss. His name. I am not sure if his name is really Albert or since he apparently, or could have been, born and died on the same day that he was named for the township that he was born into.

Thank you for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today!

Footnote;

  1. “Michigan Deaths, 1867-1897,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N3VR-JQ8 : 12 December 2014), Albert Mccormack, 05 Jan 1892; citing p 332 rn 90, Albert Twp, Montmorency, Michigan, Department of Vital Records, Lansing; FHL microfilm 2,363,831.

 

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

This is a slight rewrite of a post I wrote last year. I think it is pretty good and I will like to recognize all the McCormack mothers even with a reused post.

Happy Mother’s Day, Ladies!

————————————

Today is Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow without any children. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 total children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

Young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel (Davis) McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth Jane (Rohr) McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special and to I owe much. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

May Dates for the McCormack Clan!

I apologize for being SO very late on this. Remembering these people and what they did and happened to them is very important. I got to meet one of these people, Violet Ingleright. I met her in the early 1990s in Niles, Michigan. She was very nice and an interesting lady.

 

9 May 1971 – Grace Ellen McCormack died. Grace was the daughter of William and Lavina McCormack of Otter Lake, Michigan.
9 May 1949 – Patrick J. McCormack was born. Patrick was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
10 May 1901 – Violet Ingleright was born. Violet was the only daughter of Katherine McCormack and Leon R. Ingleright I. Violet was a graduate of the University of Michigan’s School of Music.
11 May 1916 – Henry Davis McCormack was born. Henry, or “HD” as I call him, he was the eldest grandson of John Michael McCormack.
12 May 1916 – Cora Ann McCormack died. Cora was married to Frank J. McCormack. He was the
14 May 1890 – Henry McCormack married Minne Myrtle VanWormer. Henry was a prominent businessman in both Ypsilanti and Ithaca, Michigan. He was the son of Michael and Catherine (Payne) McCormack.
14 May 1994 – Daniel Asprin died. Daniel was married to Margaret Lorraine Coon. Margaret was the great-granddaughter of Michael and Catherine McCormack.
18 May 1920 – Jimmie D. Keen was born. Jimmie was married to James Archer McCormack, the son of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
22 May 2008 – Robert Lynn Asprin died. Robert was the grandson of Grace Ellen McCormack. He was also a famous science fiction writer. He was the author of the Myth Adventures and Phule’s Company series. He was very active in the beginning of the Society for Creative Anachronism.
23 May 1966 – Hiram J. Stevens died. Hiram was married to Mae Ethel McCormack, the oldest daughter of Edward J. McCormack and Elizabeth J. Rohr.
24 May 1947 – Michael Alan McCormack was born. Michael was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
26 May 1951 – William David McCormack was born. William was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
26 May 1897 – Lura Maude McCormack was born. She was the daughter of Edward McCormack and Elizabeth J. Rohr.
26 May 1918 – Robert Henry Addy married Addie C. Snyder. Robert was the youngest child of Delilah Elizabeth McCormack and Smith Addy.
26 May 1924 – Lura Maude McCormack married Dudley B. Palmer.
30 May 1986 – Alta McCormack Ford died. She was my grandmother and daughter of William E. and Lavina J. (Hemingway) McCormack.
30 May 1931 – Nella Mae McCormack was born. Nell was the daughter of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today!

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

Yesterday was Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 more children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

A young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel Davis McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel Davis McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

Belated November McCormack family birthdays!

I know that it isn’t November any more, but I still wanted to remember the following people because if you are forgotten you are truly dead and I don’t want these people to be forgotten. So I apologize to them and to my readers for not getting this post done when I should have.

Here are the November birthdays that happened in the McCormack family.

Last Name, First & Mid Name                                        Birth Date                      Birth Place

Coon                         Margaret Lorriane                          12 Nov 1917                    Dewitt, Michigan
Dornauf                   Elizabeth Petronella                       12 Nov 1866                Weisbaden, Germany
McCormack            Arthur A.                                             14 Nov 1861                    London, Canada
McCormack            Edward James                                   21 Nov 1856                    London, Canada
McCormack            Gertrude “Betty” Jeanette               3 Nov 1917                     Sparks, Nevada
McCormack            Grace Ellen                                        24 Nov 1885                   Ypsilanti, Michigan
McCormack            Katherine Fidelia                             26 Nov 1870                   Ypsilanti, Michigan
Naugle                     Margaret Iseman                             4 Nov 1864                       Pennsylvania
Smith                        Suzanne Mae                                   16 Nov 1929                     Sioux City, Iowa

I know that I previously posted about Betty McCormack and Katherine McCormack for their birthdays, so I won’t talk about them here. But please visit their posts. They were both incredible ladies.

There are a couple of people that I would like to briefly talk about here. Both are sons of Michael and Catherine (Payne) McCormack, my great-great grandparents.

It is Edward (James) McCormack. I have very little information about him. He was the younger brother to my great grandfather, William E. McCormack. Edward and his father, Michael, both bought land in northern Lower Michigan. Edward was the only one who stayed up there. Edward was married to, IMHO, very incredible woman, Elizabeth Jane Dimick. I wrote about her in these posts, Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack and Tombstone Tuesday – Elizabeth J. McCormack and Stationary Sunday – The McCormack General Store of Mio, Michigan. Back to Edward. From what I gathered about him, Edward was a farmer up in northern Michigan. I don’t know when it happened, but sometime after he died, the land that he bought was sold or lost by his widow. Unfortunately, during the winter of 1898, 15 Feb, he died. From what I was told by his granddaughter, he caught a cold and died when it worsened. I don’t know much else about him. I don’t even have a picture of him. Happy belated birthday, great-granduncle Edward!

The second person is Edward’s (and William’s) younger brother, Arthur McCormack. Here is the one picture I have of him;

Arthur McCormack at the family reunion in Otter Lake, Michigan.

Arthur McCormack at the family reunion in Otter Lake, Michigan.

I know a little more about Uncle Arthur but not much. Except for his older brother William, he was born like the rest of his brothers in London, Canada. From the old telephone directories I have been able to find, I know that he held many jobs during his lifetime. For a long time, he and his wife, Elizabeth Dornauf, lived in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He also lived in Detroit, Michigan for a while. I also know that he and Elizabeth had no children that lived. So it is left to me, I guess, to remember him. Like his brother, Edward, Arthur died too young in my opinion. He died on 13 Feb 1933 of a cerebral hemorrhage in Chicago, Illinois. A weird coincidence I just noticed is that Arthur died almost 35 years after Edward. Happy belated birthday, great-granduncle Arthur!

Thanks for stopping and reading this post. I hope you learned something new about the McCormack family.

The McCormacks in 1930 America

In my continuing series about the location of the McCormack family, I would like to share with you the 1930 map of the McCormack family in the United States. Once again, I want to remind people that I am only showing the locations for Michael and Catherine and their children.

Just a reminder and to keep everyone updated, Michael and Catherine passed away in 1912 [1] and 1913 [2], respectively. Their eldest daughter, Delilah died in 1905 [3]. Her younger brother, Edward, had died in 1898 [4]. In 1917, Frank died [5]. More of a broken heart than anything else I suspect. Then in 1929, John Michael died [6] almost two years after his wife died.

The McCormack family in 1930 America

The McCormack family in 1930 America

1. Otter Lake, Michigan – William and Lavina. [7]
2. Delilah (McCormack) and Smith Addy. Delilah died in 1905. [3]
3. Big Creek Township, Michigan – Elizabeth McCormack. She is the widow of Edward McCormack. [4]
4. Reno, Nevada – John Michael and Gertrude McCormack died in 1929 and 1927 respectively. [6]
5. Chicago, Illinois – Arthur and Elizabeth McCormack. [8]
6. Ithaca, Michigan – Henry and Margaret McCormack. [9] Henry’s first wife, Minnie, died in 1918 [14].
7. Kankakee, Illinois – Frank and Cora McCormack. Frank died in 1917 [10] and Cora died in 1916 [13].
8. Flint, Michigan – Minnie (McCormack) Barnes. [11] Once again, I am not exactly 100% sure about this note. I have a Maria “Minnie” Barnes listed in Flint and she is listed as a widow. In other records, she is listed as divorced. But her husband, Charles, didn’t die until 1941. Perhaps she wished dead?
9. Niles, Michigan – Katherine (McCormack) and Leon Ingleright. [12] Katherine’s husband, Leon, was a doctor in Niles, Michigan.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!

Footnotes;

1. Michigan, Department of State, Death Certificate “Registered No. 7”, 5 Dec 1912, Michael McCormack, Division of Vital Statistics, Lansing.
2. Michigan, Department of State, Death Certificate, 1913, Catherine (Payne) McCormack, Division of Vital Statistics, Lansing.
3. New York (State), New York State Department of Health, death certificate Registered No. 12501 (stamped no. 10934), 21 Mar 1905, Delilah Elizabeth (McCormack) Addy, Bureau of Vital Statistics, Schenectady, New York.
4. Montmorency County, Michigan, Death Certificate, Bk. 1 & Pg. 10, Edward McCormack.
5. “Frank J. McCormack,” Obituary, 10 Dec 1917 (Monday), Kankakee (IL) Daily Republican, Pg. 6, col. 7, digital image.
6. Nevada, Nevada State Board of Health, death certificate, State Index No. 339 & Local Registered No. 566, (1929), John Michael McCormack, Division of Health Vital Statistics, Carson City.
7. 1930 United States Federal Census, Otter Lake, Marathon Township, Lapeer County, Michigan, population schedule, ED 44-21, Pg. 3A (penned), dwelling 58, family 61, William E. McCormack, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, accessed 2 April 2008, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.
8. 1930 United States Federal Census, Chicago, Cook County, Illinois, population schedule, Ward 49, ED 16-1865, dwelling 78, family 135, Arthur A. McCormack, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, accessed 1 Dec 2012, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.
9. 1930 United States Federal Census, Ithaca, Gratiot County, Michigan, population schedule, ED 29-14, Pg. 163 (Stamped), dwelling 413, family 423, (Thomas) Henry McCormack, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, accessed 12 Apr 2008, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.
10. “Frank J. McCormack,” Obituary, 10 Dec 1917 (Monday), Kankakee (IL) Daily Republican, Pg. 6, col. 7, digital image.
11. 1930 United States Federal Census, Flint, Genesee County, Michigan, population schedule, ED 25-15, Pg. Sheet No. 11-B, dwelling 271, family 205, Minnie Barnes, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com, accessed 1 Dec 2012, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.
12. 148. 1930 United States Federal Census, Niles, Berrien County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 12, Pg. 235, dwelling 71, family 84, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.
13. “Cora Anna (Baldwin) McCormack,” Obituary, 13 May 1916 (Saturday), Kankakee (IL) Daily Republican, Pg. 1, col. 3-4, digital image.
14. “Minnie Myrtle Van Wormer,” Obituary, 2 May 1918, Gratiot County (Ithaca, MI) Herald, Pg. 1-4, col. 2, 7-8, digital image.

Happy Birthday, Donald James McCormack!

This is another post in my continuing series about the birthdays of the McCormack family.

Today, the 9th of December, is the birthday of Donald James McCormack. He was my first cousin twice removed. Donald was the second son and fourth child of Edward James McCormack and Elizabeth Jane (Rohr) Dimmick. Donald would have been 119 years old today if he had live. He was born in 1894 somewhere in northern Michigan. I think it would have somewhere in Montmorency Count. I don’t know much about him. There is one thing that I do know about him and that is that he was involved in logging which was big in northern Michigan at the time.

Happy Birthday, cousin Donald! I hope to learn more about you so I can better tell your story.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!