Another McCormack postcard!

Early last week, I went onto eBay and I looked around. You can find a lot of family related stuff there. I have found quite a few items related to Otter Lake and my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. Most of the time I search using “Otter Lake”, “Reno”, “Michael McCormack”  or various other McCormack related search terms. So, last week I used (I think) Henry McCormack. When I typed in Henry McCormack, I was wondering what would popup in the search results. Imagine my surprise when the picture below showed up! It is just not a picture, but a POSTCARD!

The Ithaca McCormack General Store

Center Street showing the Henry McCormack Store in 1910 Ithaca, Michigan

And not just any old postcard! A postcard showing the Henry McCormack Department store on Center Street in 1910 Ithaca, Michigan! I never really imagine that someone would make a postcard of this scene. It wasn’t up for bidding. It was being sold outright. So, I made the plunge and spent the ten dollars and bought it.

I really like it because the “signs” hanging in between the windows of the second and third floors. Those signs tells us what Henry was selling at the time. It’s very interesting. I thought it would be interesting to show what the area is like more recently.

Center Street, Ithaca Michigan

Center Street, Ithaca, Michigan in 2016.

As you can see, the first two buildings are still there pretty much in the same shape as they were in 1910. It’s the rest of the street that has changed especially the building in the middle. It has lost its crown. On the facing side of the McCormack building is the stairs. I am sure that it has been rebuilt once or twice since the first picture.

Even though I have only received the postcard on Saturday May 27th, it is already one of my prized Clan McCormack ephemera collection!

Thank you for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today! 

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

This is a slight rewrite of a post I wrote last year. I think it is pretty good and I will like to recognize all the McCormack mothers even with a reused post.

Happy Mother’s Day, Ladies!

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Today is Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow without any children. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 total children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

Young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel (Davis) McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth Jane (Rohr) McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special and to I owe much. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

Yesterday was Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 more children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

A young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel Davis McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel Davis McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

The William E. McCormack general store postcard

Last Monday, 23 Mar 2015, I wrote about how I won an Ebay auction [1], for a postcard [2] showing the general store of my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack located in Otter Lake, Michigan. Btw, the store is still standing although it looks radically different looking now.

Postcard showing the William E. McCormack Store in Otter Lake, Michigan

Postcard showing the William E. McCormack Store in Otter Lake, Michigan

The front of the postcard is relatively good shape with the exception of the handwriting in the lower right quadrant and the “code” in the lower left qaudrant.

The rear side of the postcard showing the William E. McCormack store in Otter Lake, Michigan

The rear side of the postcard showing the William E. McCormack store in Otter Lake, Michigan

As shown in the first picture, this postcard has definitely been used. There are several things that we can tell from looking at the back. First, the postcard was published by the Backenstose Bookstore of Pontiac, Michigan. They published a series of postcards featuring Otter Lake that I have collected many of. Second, this postcard, as all the rest of my Otter Lake collection, was printed or made in Germany. Third, the postage was an amazing 1 cent stamp! Considering fact #4, as it appears to me, the postmark date of 23 Sep 1908 maybe charging one cent wasn’t all that amazing. From my brief research into when the stamp and postcard was printed, it appears that this particular stamp and postcard was in use from 1907 to 1914.[2] After 1914, due to World War I, postcards for use in the USA were not printed in Germany anymore but in England or the United States. Earlier, I mentioned a “code” on the front in the lower left corner. To me, it appears that the code is AGG131. As of the time of the writing of this post, I don’t know what that “code” means. Perhaps someday I will decipher and transcribe the message on the back of the postcard.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!

Footnotes;

1. “Winning an Ebay auction!”, 
2. Postcard of the William E. McCormack general store in Otter Lake, Michigan, , 2015, privately held by Jeff Ford , [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2015
3. “Tips for determining when a U.S. postcard was published”, Center of Southwest Studies, Ft. Lewis College, Durango, CO. revised 7 Aug 2006, visited 29 Mar 2015.

Winning an Ebay auction!

Last Tuesday, I won an Ebay auction bidding for the following picture/postcard;

William McCormack's store in Otter Lake, Michigan

William McCormack’s store in Otter Lake, Michigan

Now, this picture is NOT actually what I won, which was a postcard of my great-grandfather’s store in Otter Lake, Michigan. I should get the actual postcard later this week. When I do get the postcard, I will update you about what I learn from the postcard.

Thanks for stopping by!

Tombstone Tuesday – Edna Ruth (McCormack) Hebestreit

For today’s Tombstone Tuesday post, I would like to share the picture of the tombstone of Edna Ruth (McCormack) Hebestreit.

the tombstone of Edna McCormack Hebestreit

the tombstone of Edna McCormack Hebestreit [1]

Edna used to run the McCormack General Store in Mio, Michigan. She inherited it from her mother, Elizabeth J. McCormack. Her father was Edward J. McCormack who died in 1898. She is buried next to her husband, Harold in the Big Creek Township Cemetery located in Luzerne, Michigan.

Thanks for stopping by!

Footnote;

1. photo of the tombstone of Edna Ruth (McCormack) Hebestreit, , 2011, privately held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2011

Treasure Chest Thursday – The Ithaca McCormack store

Today, I would like to share my photograph of the old Henry McCormack general store in Ithaca, Michigan. I believe Henry ran it for almost 50 years.

The McCormack General Store - Ithaca

The McCormack General Store – Ithaca [1]

Thanks for stopping by!

Footnote;

1. picture of the McCormack General Store in Ithaca, Michigan, , 1994, privately held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 1994.