Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

This is a slight rewrite of a post I wrote last year. I think it is pretty good and I will like to recognize all the McCormack mothers even with a reused post.

Happy Mother’s Day, Ladies!

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Today is Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow without any children. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 total children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

Young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel (Davis) McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth Jane (Rohr) McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special and to I owe much. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

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Memories

Today, I would like to welcome as a guest blogger, my second cousin once removed, Patricia. Her father was HP McCormack and her grandfather was John Michael McCormack.

John Michael and HP

John Michael McCormack and son HP

Being the youngest of ten children I was not always aware of the goings-on of the older siblings, but one of my fondest memories was in 1945, four of my brothers returned home from WWII. My mother fixed a feast and what jubilant celebration it was. Thankfully my father, HP McCormack took moving pictures of the event which I still have and cherish, showing loving hugs to my mother and father, grandmother, aunt, the teasing between brothers, what fun it was.

Secondly, the summers spent at our cabin at King’s Beach on the North Shore of Lake Tahoe, California. It was a real log cabin built in 1932 from the pine trees cut down by my father, HP McCormack and older brothers. The older ones got to sleep in tents but younger ones in the cabin. In the mornings we would wake to the scrumptious smells of Mom’s pancakes cooking. Hurriedly we’d put on our bathing suits, gobbling down the pancakes, grabbing our towels and dashing down to the beach with our dog, Snooper, right behind us. Ack, the clear blue sparkling water was icy cold! Snooper was usually the first in and out, saunter over to us and shake that cold water all over our hot sun drenched bodies. We acquired terrible sunburns that would crack open, Mom would gently pat vinegar on the open cracked skin, ah, and the pain of it all, but soon we were as tan as could be. In the evenings we would sit around the beautiful rock fireplace, read, play games, pop popcorn and jump every time a pine cone would pop in the flames. Or, we would go to the movies, walking along the boardwalk whiffs of vanilla floating through the night air from the ice cream store.

The third fondest memory was our Christmas celebrations. Mom’s delicious turkey feasts, my father’s decorations, and family togethers. The younger ones would pile into a brother’s car, drive around town delighting in the beautiful decorations anxiously anticipating the excitement of Santa’s arrival. Upon arriving home, we would warn my brother not to honk the horn. His elbow always slipped causing a resounding loud honk. This was to warn the other brothers in the house to start ringing “Santa’s bell”. Brothers would ring the bell, throw it to the next one in another room, and we little ones would run through the house following the jingle of the bell in hopes to see Santa but never did.

I would like to thank my cousin Pat for sharing the memories that she did. If you have someone like Pat in your family, ask them about any memories that they would like to share.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something today!

Michael and his sons

This is a montage that I made up a few years ago. The pictures on the top row are from left to right: Michael McCormack, William McCormack, John Michael McCormack, Arthur McCormack and Henry McCormack.

The McCormack Men Poster

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you like what you see!

May Dates for the McCormack Clan!

I apologize for being SO very late on this. Remembering these people and what they did and happened to them is very important. I got to meet one of these people, Violet Ingleright. I met her in the early 1990s in Niles, Michigan. She was very nice and an interesting lady.

 

9 May 1971 – Grace Ellen McCormack died. Grace was the daughter of William and Lavina McCormack of Otter Lake, Michigan.
9 May 1949 – Patrick J. McCormack was born. Patrick was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
10 May 1901 – Violet Ingleright was born. Violet was the only daughter of Katherine McCormack and Leon R. Ingleright I. Violet was a graduate of the University of Michigan’s School of Music.
11 May 1916 – Henry Davis McCormack was born. Henry, or “HD” as I call him, he was the eldest grandson of John Michael McCormack.
12 May 1916 – Cora Ann McCormack died. Cora was married to Frank J. McCormack. He was the
14 May 1890 – Henry McCormack married Minne Myrtle VanWormer. Henry was a prominent businessman in both Ypsilanti and Ithaca, Michigan. He was the son of Michael and Catherine (Payne) McCormack.
14 May 1994 – Daniel Asprin died. Daniel was married to Margaret Lorraine Coon. Margaret was the great-granddaughter of Michael and Catherine McCormack.
18 May 1920 – Jimmie D. Keen was born. Jimmie was married to James Archer McCormack, the son of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
22 May 2008 – Robert Lynn Asprin died. Robert was the grandson of Grace Ellen McCormack. He was also a famous science fiction writer. He was the author of the Myth Adventures and Phule’s Company series. He was very active in the beginning of the Society for Creative Anachronism.
23 May 1966 – Hiram J. Stevens died. Hiram was married to Mae Ethel McCormack, the oldest daughter of Edward J. McCormack and Elizabeth J. Rohr.
24 May 1947 – Michael Alan McCormack was born. Michael was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
26 May 1951 – William David McCormack was born. William was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
26 May 1897 – Lura Maude McCormack was born. She was the daughter of Edward McCormack and Elizabeth J. Rohr.
26 May 1918 – Robert Henry Addy married Addie C. Snyder. Robert was the youngest child of Delilah Elizabeth McCormack and Smith Addy.
26 May 1924 – Lura Maude McCormack married Dudley B. Palmer.
30 May 1986 – Alta McCormack Ford died. She was my grandmother and daughter of William E. and Lavina J. (Hemingway) McCormack.
30 May 1931 – Nella Mae McCormack was born. Nell was the daughter of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today!

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

Yesterday was Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 more children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

A young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel Davis McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel Davis McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

John Michael McCormack – Politician?

Digging around the various newspaper sites is something that I really like to do. You find things about your ancestors that is priceless! You find out about vacations and trips that they take. You find out about graduation mostly from college. You also find out about marriages and deaths in the your family.

Today, I would like to show you one particular fact that I have found out about my great-grand uncle, John Michael McCormack. He is well known as a hotel owner, stone mason. In fact, he started out in life as a stone mason reportedly working on the Brooklyn Bridge. I can’t remember when I saw this, but it got me wondering if he had another career that I hadn’t found out yet.

1912 Washoe Co. Election Results1912 Washoe County elections results [1]

You see John Michael’s name with the symbol of the Progressive party (P) next to his name under MEMBER STATE ASSEMBLY. I really didn’t pursue that lead any. I thought maybe that it was someone else with the same initials. Then I found these from another article.

Hard up for candidates

Hard Up for Candidates [2]

Voters of the Third Ward

John Michael McCormack’s “statement” to voters of the 3rd Ward of Reno. [2]

Then I saw this;

For The Assembly II

Candidates for the Assembly [3]

Finally, I found this gem;

John Michael McCormack - Politician

John Michael McCormack’s candidate bio [4]

That was his bio as written by – I guess – the local Progressive party. But as you read earlier, John Michael wasn’t a candidate by choice. He was picked when he was out of town on business. I guess that this time in his life was pretty interesting. I wonder if he had some “choice” words for the local Progressive Party.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today!

Footnotes;

  1. John Michael McCormack, “Election Results—Returns From Washoe County,” 8 Nov 1912 (Friday), The (Daily) (Reno, Nevada) Nevada State Journal, p. 4, col. 3; digital images, NewspapersArchive.com (http://www.newspapersarchive.com : accessed 15 Feb 2012), Historical Newspaper Collection.
  2. John Michael McCormack, “Voters of the Third Ward,” 5 May 1903 (Tuesday), The Daily (Reno) Nevada State Journal, p.1, col. 6; digital images, NewspapersArchive.com (http://www.newspapersarchive.com : accessed 15 Feb 2012), Historical Newspaper Collection.
  3. John Michael McCormack, “For The Assembly, ” 8 Nov 1912 (Friday), The Nevada (Reno, Nevada) State Journal, p. 12, col. 3; digital images, NewspapersArchive.com (http://www.newspapersarchive.com : accessed 17 Apr 2016), Historical Newspaper Collection.
  4. John Michael McCormack, “For The Assembly, ” 8 Nov 1912 (Friday), The Nevada (Reno, Nevada) State Journal, p. 12, col. 3; digital images, NewspapersArchive.com (http://www.newspapersarchive.com : accessed 17 Apr 2016), Historical Newspaper Collection.

And the winner is. . . .

. . . Gertrude Angeline (Peacock) McCormack, for the best pin cushion! She won it or was awarded it at the Nevada State Fair in Sept 1986.

That’s what I found in the new collection, “Compilation of Published Sources” at MyHeritage.com. It is a terrific collection for genealogists/family historians like myself. Look down to Group 23 Class 251 and you will see an entry for a Mrs. J. M. McCormack.

Here is the page;

Gertrude McCormack & Pin Cushion

Like I said in my blog post, “John Michael McCormack as a stonemason”, it is finding items like the entry for money owed to John Michael McCormack and then this one for Gertrude McCormack winning the best pin cushion that really makes it worthwhile for genealogists/family historians like myself. It adds texture and substance to a person’s life that might otherwise consist just of dates and places. It tells what the person might have done in their life.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something maybe new and hopefully interesting!