Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

This is a slight rewrite of a post I wrote last year. I think it is pretty good and I will like to recognize all the McCormack mothers even with a reused post.

Happy Mother’s Day, Ladies!

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Today is Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow without any children. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 total children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

Young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel (Davis) McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth Jane (Rohr) McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special and to I owe much. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.

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The McCormacks in their own hand!

Sometime back, I saw another blogger write about their ancestor’s signatures. It seemed like a very good idea. Here are a few signatures of some of the McCormacks.

The very first signature that I would like show is of Michael McCormack. It is from his land grant/homestead application when he and his son, Edward J. McCormack were in the process of homesteading/buying some land in the northern portion of the lower peninsula of Michigan. This signature is dated 18 Nov 1884.

michael-mccormack-ii

Michael McCormack [1]

The second signature is also from Michael. This is from his naturalization oath paperwork. It was dated 18 Nov 1884. 

michael-mccormack

Michael McCormack [2]

My next signature is from Michael’s youngest daughter, Katherine. It is from a five page letter that she wrote on 28 May 1918 to her niece, Edith Marie McCormack. Edith was the daughter of Katherine’s older brother, Henry. She wrote the letter to Edith about a month after the death of Edith Marie’s mother, Minnie McCormack from cancer.

katherine-mccormack-ingleright

Aunt Kate aka Katherine Fildelia (McCormack) Ingleright [3]

Robert was the son of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack. This signature comes from Robert’s DD214 or his “Report Of Separation From The Armed Forces Of The United States.” He had serviced in WWII in addition to Korea. When he was discharged, he was a Captain and flown P-51s in both WWII and Korea.

robert-michael-mccormack

Robert Michael McCormack [4]

My final signature is Nella Mae McCormack. Nell was the daughter of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack. Her signature was from the marriage certificate of her marriage to her husband.

nella-mae-mccormack

Nella Mae McCormack [5]

One thing that I noticed about Nell’s and Michael’s signature, in example #2, is how similar that she and Michael made their  big “C” in McCormack.

I thought this was an interesting and different way to talk about the McCormack clan. 

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today!

Footnotes;

1. Application no. 1959, 29 February 1884, in Michael McCormack (Montmorency County) homestead file bearing final certificate no. 979, 30 January 1885, Detroit, Michigan, Land Office; Land Entry Papers, 1800-1908; Records of the Bureau of Land Management, Record Group 49; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

2. Michael McCormack Oath of Naturalization, 18 Nov 1884, currently held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2013.

3. Katherine “Kate” (McCormack) Ingleright (Rose City, Michigan) to Edith Marie McCormack, 28 May 1918; privately by Lance Andrewsen, [RESEARCHER’S CONTACT INFORMATION,] 2011. The letter’s recipient is the grandmother of the current holder.  

4. Robert Michael McCormack DD214 “Report Of Separation From The Armed Forces Of The United States”, 31 Jan 1953; currently held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2009.

5. Washington, Marriage Records, 1854-2013, database and digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com: accessed 26 Sep 2016), entry for Chester John Lowney and Nella Mae McCormack, 23 Aug 1952, certificate No. 10371B.

 

Happy Birthday, Aunt Kate!

Once again, I am doing something I don’t like to do. I am going repost my previously  published post about my great grand-aunt Kate, but since I haven’t been able learn anything new and I do want to honor the memory of my great grand-aunt Kate. I do wish that I could have met her while she was alive and well. I wonder what kind of lady she was. Thanks!

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Today is my great grand-aunt Katherine “Kate” Fidelia (McCormack) Ingleright’s birthday. Katherine was the youngest of 10 children of Michael and Catherine McCormack. She was born on 26 Nov 1870 in Ypsilanti, Michigan.

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright [1]

On 19 Jul 1899 in Lapeer, Michigan she married Leon Ray Ingleright of Niles, Michigan. For most of the next ten years, she and Leon lived with her parents in Otter Lake. [2] Sometime before the 1910 census, her husband who was a doctor, got his own practice or joined one in Rose City, Michigan. [3][4] As far as I know, she and Leon had two wonderful children, Violet Cassie and Leon Ray, Jr. They were born in 1901 and 1903 respectively and both in Rose City. At sometime between the 1920 and the 1930 censuses, Katherine and her family moved to Niles, Michigan. [5] They and their descendants would make Niles and the southwestern corner of Michigan their home up to the present.

There is one reason that my Aunt Katherine is special to me. She and I share the same birthday. I was born 91 years after her. In fact, she was still alive when I was born. But my parents had no knowledge of her branch of the McCormack family.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!

Footnotes;

1. picture of Katherine Fidelia (McCormack) Ingleright, , 2009, privately held by Jeff Ford, [ADDRESS FOR PRIVATE USE,] Lebanon, Tennessee, 2009
2. 1900 United States Federal Census, Otter Lake, Marathon Township, Lapeer County, Michigan, population schedule, ED 43, Pg. 7B, dwelling 173, family 173, Michael McCormack, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com, accessed 6 Feb 2011, citing Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900. T623, 1854 rolls.
3. 1910 United States Federal Census, Rose City, Ogemaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 38, Pg. 250, dwelling 3, family 75, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, accessed 1 Dec 2012, citing Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910 (NARA microfilm publication T624, 1,178 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
4. 1920 United States Federal Census, Rose City, Ogemaw County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 280, dwelling 54, family 55, Leon R. Ingelright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920. (NARA microfilm publication T625, 2076 rolls). Records of the Bureau of the Census, Record Group 29. National Archives, Washington, D.C.
5. 1930 United States Federal Census, Niles, Berrien County, Michigan, population schedule, Ward 3, ED 12, Pg. 235, dwelling 71, family 84, Leon R. Ingleright, digital image, Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, citing Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930. Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930. T626, 2,667 rolls.

McCormack family important dates for November

Hello! I know that it has been quite a long time since I last posted a story here. Sometimes life gets in the way of blogging. Even though it is almost the mid of November, I would like to start the month of November off with a post about important dates in the McCormack family.

The McCormack Family Reunion

The McCormack Family Reunion

November

3 Nov 1917: Gertrude “Betty” Jeanette McCormack was born. She was the first daughter and second child of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She was born in Sparks, Nevada which is a “suburb” of Reno, Nevada.

Betty J McCormack Waltz

Gertrude “Betty” J. McCormack Waltz

4 Nov 1988: Suzanne Mae Smith died. Suzanne was the wife of William D. McCormack. He was the sixth child and fifth son of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack. Suzanne and William had three children, one daughter and two sons. She died in Eugene, Oregon.

14 Nov 1861: Arthur A. McCormack was born. I hope you have had a chance to read the post, “Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap,” I wrote about Arthur recently. He was the only “bad boy” of the McCormack family that I know of. He was also the executor of his brother, Frank J. McCormack’s estate.

Arthur McCormack

Arthur McCormack at the family reunion in Otter Lake, Michigan.

15 Nov 1860: Patrick J. McCormack died. Actually, I don’t know for sure if Patrick was his first name. The way his name appeared on the 1861 Canada census it looked like to me that it was PJ.Since Michael’s father was named Patrick and at the time, I had just lost a (newly found) cousin by the name Patrick J., I decided to name him Patrick J. McCormack. Unfortunately in his short life, his entry on the 1861 Canadian census was his only notable achievement.

16 Nov 1951: Henry McCormack died. Henry was Michael and Catherine’s seventh child and sixth son. He was a leading member of the Ithaca business community. Here are some blog posts about Henry; “Pictures of Henry McCormack and family”, “Sunday’s Obituary – Henry McCormack”, Wordless Wednesday – Three Generations of the Henry McCormack family”.

Henry McCormack

a young Henry McCormack

21 Nov 1912: Michael McCormack died. The patriarch of the McCormack clan. Here is a post to get your appetite wetted!

Michael McCormack

Michael McCormack

21 Nov 1856: Edward James McCormack was born. Like the rest of his brothers, save for his older brother William, he was born in London, Ontario, Canada. Edward was the third child and second son. I believe sometime in the early 1880s, Edward and Michael came up with the idea of moving up to the northern Lower Michigan to farm.

24 Nov 1885: Grace Ellen McCormack was born. Grace was the only child of William E. McCormack and Lura Grace Roys (she was William’s first wife).

Grace McCormack

Grace McCormack Woodbury about 1957.

26 Nov 1870: Katherine Fidelia McCormack was born. Katherine is one of my favorite McCormack relatives. Perhaps the first reason is that she and I share the same birthday of November 26th. She is also the only female child of Michael and Catherine that I have a picture of.

Aunt Katherine

Katherine (McCormack) Ingleright

26 Nov 1986: Raymond Louis Tougeron died. Ray was the husband of Ethel Rebecca McCormack. She was the second daughter and seventh child of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack. She and Ray would have one daughter and three sons.

raymond-tougeron-sr

Raymond L. Tougeron, Sr.

29 Nov 1883: William McCormack married Lura Grace Roys. Lura was William’s (my great-grandfather) first wife. They were married in Ypsilanti, Michigan. Lura was from Ypsilanti. They had one daughter, Grace Ellen McCormack before the unfortunate death of Lura.

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I would like to remind everyone that there is a lot more to the people listed here. If you have anything you would like to add about any of these people, please feel free to contact me. I also would like to thank you for stopping by and I hope you learned something.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something!

P.S. If you see anything that needs correcting, please let me know! Thanks again!

Michael and his sons

This is a montage that I made up a few years ago. The pictures on the top row are from left to right: Michael McCormack, William McCormack, John Michael McCormack, Arthur McCormack and Henry McCormack.

The McCormack Men Poster

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you like what you see!

May Dates for the McCormack Clan!

I apologize for being SO very late on this. Remembering these people and what they did and happened to them is very important. I got to meet one of these people, Violet Ingleright. I met her in the early 1990s in Niles, Michigan. She was very nice and an interesting lady.

 

9 May 1971 – Grace Ellen McCormack died. Grace was the daughter of William and Lavina McCormack of Otter Lake, Michigan.
9 May 1949 – Patrick J. McCormack was born. Patrick was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
10 May 1901 – Violet Ingleright was born. Violet was the only daughter of Katherine McCormack and Leon R. Ingleright I. Violet was a graduate of the University of Michigan’s School of Music.
11 May 1916 – Henry Davis McCormack was born. Henry, or “HD” as I call him, he was the eldest grandson of John Michael McCormack.
12 May 1916 – Cora Ann McCormack died. Cora was married to Frank J. McCormack. He was the
14 May 1890 – Henry McCormack married Minne Myrtle VanWormer. Henry was a prominent businessman in both Ypsilanti and Ithaca, Michigan. He was the son of Michael and Catherine (Payne) McCormack.
14 May 1994 – Daniel Asprin died. Daniel was married to Margaret Lorraine Coon. Margaret was the great-granddaughter of Michael and Catherine McCormack.
18 May 1920 – Jimmie D. Keen was born. Jimmie was married to James Archer McCormack, the son of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
22 May 2008 – Robert Lynn Asprin died. Robert was the grandson of Grace Ellen McCormack. He was also a famous science fiction writer. He was the author of the Myth Adventures and Phule’s Company series. He was very active in the beginning of the Society for Creative Anachronism.
23 May 1966 – Hiram J. Stevens died. Hiram was married to Mae Ethel McCormack, the oldest daughter of Edward J. McCormack and Elizabeth J. Rohr.
24 May 1947 – Michael Alan McCormack was born. Michael was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
26 May 1951 – William David McCormack was born. William was the grandson of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.
26 May 1897 – Lura Maude McCormack was born. She was the daughter of Edward McCormack and Elizabeth J. Rohr.
26 May 1918 – Robert Henry Addy married Addie C. Snyder. Robert was the youngest child of Delilah Elizabeth McCormack and Smith Addy.
26 May 1924 – Lura Maude McCormack married Dudley B. Palmer.
30 May 1986 – Alta McCormack Ford died. She was my grandmother and daughter of William E. and Lavina J. (Hemingway) McCormack.
30 May 1931 – Nella Mae McCormack was born. Nell was the daughter of Henry Peacock and Ethel (Davis) McCormack.

Thanks for stopping by and I hope you learned something new today!

Mother’s Day for the McCormack women!

Yesterday was Mother’s Day and I would like to celebrate the McCormack women below and others who are not shown and talked about here. I must add that other than my grandmother, Alta McCormack Ford, I have not met any of these women. I was inspired to write this post because of a friend of mine, Michelle Ganus Taggart over at her blog, A Southern Sleuth, and her post, Mothers and Grandmothers. Thank you, Michelle!

The first McCormack woman that I would like to celebrate is the matriarch of the McCormack clan, Catherine (Paine/Payne) McCormack. Briefly, I know that she was born in Ireland. There is a “suggestion” out there that she was born in either County Cork, Ireland or Cork the city. She was married before marrying Michael McCormack but as far as I know, her first husband died leaving her young widow. In 1853, she married Michael and gave birth to her first child, my great-grandfather, William E. McCormack. What really stands out to me is that soon after he was born, he and his parents left Ireland to the United States via Liverpool, England. When they left Ireland, William was maybe 4 or 5 months old. At that time, the trans-Atlantic trip took about six weeks. Even now, traveling with an infant is not easy. Also, they made the trip around October/November of 1853. The weather couldn’t have been the greatest! The next thing that really impresses me about her is that she followed and gave Michael 10 more children of which 9 lived to adulthood. She moved from Kentucky – the “rumor” is that her brother lived in Harrodsburg, Kentucky – to Ypsilanti, Michigan to London, Ontario then back to Ypsilanti then up to northern Michigan and finally living in the same village as her first son, William.

Catherine McCormack

Catherine McCormack

The second woman that I would like to celebrate is my great-grandmother, Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack. As I have mentioned before, she is my connection to the famed Hemingway name. What stands out to me about her is that the circumstances in which she came into the McCormack clan. She and William lived in the same village, Otter Lake, prior to the marriage. So, she must have known William’s first wife, Lura before she died unexpectedly and William and Lura’s daughter, Grace. It seemed that she handled things with grace. She and William had three beautiful children of which my grandmother, Alta McCormack was one of.

Lavina Jane (Hemingway) McCormack

Lavina Jane McCormack

The next woman that I would like to remember here is my grandmother, Alta Lyleth (McCormack) Ford. She was born in Otter Lake, Michigan in 1902 and was the middle child of William and Lavina. One of the things that I remember about her is when I was a little kid is that me and my family would visit her at her house. She had a corner house in Garden City, Michigan. I would run around the house and my parents or grandmother would “time” me. Little did I know at the time is that none of them timed me. I am crushed! (haha!) I would also stay a few days with her every summer as a young kid. I remember helping her do some work on her garden that she had in her backyard. There were a few stories about her childhood but sadly I really don’t remember any of them. I am working on a post about her trip to Europe in 1925 with her younger sister, Ruth. Sadly, she died while I was in the service (Army) in California in 1986 and a few years before I really got into my McCormack family history. She could have been a real treasure trove of knowledge.

Young Alta

A young Alta McCormack

The next woman that I would like to talk about is Ethel Davis McCormack. She was the wife of Henry Peacock McCormack, the only child of John Michael and Gertrude (Peacock) McCormack. The biggest thing that impresses me about Ethel, besides being a rather small woman in stature, is that she like her grandmother-in-law, Catherine, she had 10 children of which one is still alive! Anytime, a woman has 10 children, that is simply amazing! When her youngest child was born, her oldest was 21 years old!

Ethel Davis McCormack

Ethel Davis McCormack

The final woman that I would like to tell you about is Elizabeth Jane (Rohr/Dimmick) McCormack. I have written about her before – Celebrating Women’s History Month – Elizabeth J. (Rohr) Dimmick McCormack – but I will try to briefly tell you about her. Her story is very impressive. Very. She had married Edward J. McCormack, son of Michael and Catherine in 1886. In 1898, he died. At the time, they had four children. Here’s the kicker. She was pregnant with their last child. Northern lower Michigan in the winter is not a nice place. For a young woman with four children and another one on the way, it can be brutal. Well, she bought a general store in Mio, Michigan and raised her kids. She never remarried either. To top everything off, when she was 69, she “adopted” her two of her granddaughters. They were 7 years old and younger. Something else, huh? I thought so too.

Elizabeth J. Rohr McCormack

Elizabeth McCormack behind the counter of her general store

I don’t want to have “favorites” here, but Catherine McCormack and her daughter-in-law, Elizabeth Rohr McCormack are two very impressive women. I am very proud that they were a part of the McCormack legacy.

I would like to mention two additional women. My mother and sister. My mother is something special. My sister is something else too. She and her husband had four kids of their own. About 5 or 6 years ago, they adopted three sisters.

Happy Mother’s Day to the women that I talked about here and to the rest of the McCormack mothers that I couldn’t mention due primarily to time and space!

I would like to thank you and everyone else for stopping by! I hope you learned something new and special.