Shipping Sunday – The McCormacks coming to America

Today, I would like to continue a “theme” of some of my posts for the past week or so. I have blogged about Michael and Catherine, my great great grandparents, their marriage, the baptism of their son, William E. McCormack (my great grandfather). For today’s post, I would like to share the manifest list from the Dirigo, the ship that carried the nascent McCormack family from England to America.

S.S. Dirigo Manifest List

Dirigo Manifest List [1]

As you can see, they left from the port of Liverpool, England apparently on 5 Oct 1853 and arrived in port (of New Orleans) on 20 Nov 1853. The Dirigo’s captain was Cyrus Cooper. Information that we can glean from this manifest is the birth of William,any profession and their ancestry. The fifth column is entitled “Number of infants not older than one year.” The entry, listed in Catherine’s row, is Sept(ember). That is problematic because it conflicts with the birthdate that was stated on William’s death certificate which was given by his wife. It does match up with the baptism record that I showed in my post, “Sharing Saturday – William E. McCormack’s Baptismal record.” Although, at the top of that document it does state that it is a baptism record (index). Another interesting piece of information that we get from this manifest list is Michael’s apparent profession, laborer. That does tend to match up with his professions upon arriving in America. It does conflict with the family myth that Michael was some sort of instructor or even a religious figure of some type. The last piece that we can gather is the ancestry or national origin of Michael and Catherine. It has columns for people of English, Scotch, Irish, American or other. If Michael was Scottish, one would assume that he would have told the person taking the information that he was Scottish. But he and Catherine are listed as Irish. Right now, one has to believe that they were Irish. Most of the (future) information given by either one of them stated that they were Irish. But that is a topic for a future post.

Thank you for stopping by!

Footnotes;

1. “Passenger Lists of Vessels Arriving at New Orleans, Louisiana, 1820-1902,” Ancestry.com, http://search.ancestry.com/, Michael McCormack, digital image, accessed 7 Jan 2007, New Orleans, Louisiana, S. S. Dirigo.

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